The Self Build Self Help Site Build Process - Drylining

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Build Process - Drylining
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Some plasterers will stick plasterboard onto the block walls "freehand" i.e. using their skill to make the boards plumb (or otherwise). If the plasterboard is not plumb then there can be problems when fixing kitchen wall cabinets and the reveals around windows will appear out of plumb. What is shown below is a technique to make sure that the boards are absolutely plumb and also flush with each other.

Photo of drylining

Pads made from plasterboard offcuts can be stuck onto the wall with a builders adhesive, top and bottom. A straight edge and spirit level is used to ensure that the pads are plumb. Once the adhesive is dabbed onto the walls, the plasterboard is applied and tapped onto the pads with a long straight edge. Once the board is against the pads then the board is plumb.


An 8 foot straight edge is also used to ensure the pads are in-line horizontally before any plasterboard is put up.




The boards are supported on timber pieces to raise them about 75mm from the block and beam floor - to accomodate the finished floor level (FFL) and get a tight fit to the ceiling boards at the top.









To the right, a blue packer has been added to the bottom pad to bring the pads out plumb.

Photo of drylining

Photo of drylining








To the left, a close up of a pad sited above a doorframe - the pad will support both the plasterboard head and the sheet to the right.

Photo of drylining

Photo of drylining

"Dot and dabbing" block walls to stick the plasterboard on.

Photo of drylining

Photo of drylining

Pads made from plasterboard offcuts can be stuck onto the wall with a builders adhesive, top and bottom. A straight edge and spirit level is used to ensure that the pads are plumb. Once the adhesive is dabbed onto the walls, the plasterboard is applied and tapped onto the pads with a long straight edge. Once the board is against the pads then the board is plumb.
An 8 foot straight edge is also used to ensure the pads are in-line horizontally before any plasterboard is put up.

The boards are supported on timber pieces to raise them about 75mm from the block and beam floor - to accomodate the finished floor level (FFL) and get a tight fit to the ceiling boards at the top.
To the right, a blue packer has been added to the bottom pad to bring the pads out plumb.

Photo of drylining

Photo of drylining


Above, a close up of a pad sited above a doorframe - the pad will support both the plasterboard head and the sheet to the right.

Photo of drylining

Photo of drylining

"Dot and dabbing" block walls to stick the plasterboard on. We used more than usual dans here in order to ensure the plastrboard was firm for installing the stair strings.

Photo of drylining

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